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Maths Week @ Douglas Community School!

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This year Maths Week ran from October 13th – 21st and Science Week is running from November 11th – 18th. As part of these two national events, Douglas Community School is running Maths and Science workshops for local 5th class students, with a very hands-on and exciting feel to them!

The Maths workshops focus on the maths behind magic tricks and winning strategies in games, while the Science workshops look at the microscopic world around us and the fascinating effects of fire.

Click on the videos below to see what the workshops involve! You can click here to see how to win at the games, or do the card tricks (and see why they always work).


Maths Workshop 1: Crafty Card Tricks

Click on the videos to see the maths-based card tricks we performed as part of this workshop. We’ll put up explanations to the tricks once Maths Week is over!

There’s a trick involved in the first one, but the other two are purely mathematical – no trick, just amazing maths!


Maths Workshop 2: Gargantuan Games

Click on the videos below to see descriptions of the games we played as part of this workshop. We’ll put up solutions to all the games once Maths Week is over!


Science Workshop 1: See Your Cells

Students get an opportunity to view their own cells under the microscope!

Using a simple dye and a piece of sellotape, students remove a few cells from the back of their own hand.

For the first time in their lives they will be able to see their own cells; our most basic building blocks.

Click here to see the slide show from the workshop, as a pdf file.

Click here to see the video we watched as part of this workshop.

There are more videos like that here, and yet more science and maths videos here!


Science Workshop 2: Fascinating Fire

Students investigate the amazing power of heat: how do solids, liquids and gases react when they are heated and cooled?

It’s easy to show that a solid increases in size when it’s heated (though you might need oven gloves to hold it!).

But how would you show that a gas or a liquid increases in size?

Click here to see the slide show from the workshop, as a pdf file.